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to the important issues regarding pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tr
is among eight people killed by a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. as you probably know the obama administration has stepped up the use of drones overseas to target suspected terrorists. president obama's nomination of john brennan to be the next cia director suggests that trend is likely to continue. brennan, a strong proponent of drones as the president's chief counterterrorism advisor. for more on how the u.s. drone program works let's get to chief washington correspondent james rosen. he is live for us at the state department. james? >> reporter: jon, good morning. this program presents a consistent headache for the diplomats in this building and who must frequently contend with complaints from afghan and pakistani officials who say these drones all too often wind up killing innocent civilians instead of terrorists the drone program is one of the national security initiatives that president obama inherited from the bush administration and one which the current commander-in-chief has dramatically expanded. for all his criticism of president bush during the 2008 campaign over hi
with facilitation for talks. reconciliation requires constructive support from across the region, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken, and look for more tangible steps, because a stable at future afghanistan is in the interest of not only the afghans and the united states but of the entire region. we reaffirmed the strategic partnership that we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties in trade talks, commerce, , education, and opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans into the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. let me close by saying this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and the tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces will still be growing stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments at the ballot that delivers for the af
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
drone strikes in pakistan, then read marxists talking about the same thing, you could not tell them apart. marxists would say this shows how evil capitalism is. there is overlap about the particular issue. >> how does the institute fit in with "reason" magazine? >> i see them as policy wants to help shape policy better. there are not doing anything radical. they are trying to say things like, rather than doing social security this way, we will do it this way. people think we have to do single payer health insurance. if we allow for competition, we could have health insurance that would be better than what we have. we tried to influence decisions on capitol hill in a way that is politically feasible, not likely. something that could happen. >> i wrote down a number of institutes you talked about in your book and i wanted to ask you about who finances these. the koch brothers were. you had a falling out with one of the founders. you mentioned the foundation. george mason. how does that fit in? >> another policy group, and i do not pay enough attention to them. >> the frazier institute
abroad, launching more than a dozen attacks in yemen and pakistan already this year. this week the u.s. launched at least five drone strikes in yemen in as many days, according to some reports, the latest attack mistakenly killed two children in yemen. north korea is selling to conduct further rocket launches and nuclear test and at the united states. the government issued the threat against what it calls its sworn enemy one day after the insecurity council resolution tightened sanctions in response to a north korean rocket launch last month. the u.n. resolution was approved with the backing of china, north korea's long major diplomatic ally. china is calling for a resumption of six-party talks in a bid to diffuse tensions. a former informant for the u.s. drug enforcement a ministration has been sentenced to 35 years in prison for his role in the 2008 attacks in mumbai. david headley has submitted to scouting targets for the group linked to the attacks. the group is blamed for killing 160 people, including six americans. he was given a reduced sentence in return for his testimony aga
. he was advisor to four presidents, president obama asked him to lead his afghanistan-pakistan policy review in early 2009 and he did that for a couple of months before happily, for us, returning to brookings. bruce has written already two books in the time he's been here, actually a third is about to come out, i'll mention that in just a second, but the first two were about al qaeda and then about the u.s.-pakistan relationship "the deadly embrace." . his new book, coming out next month is "avoiding armageddon" and it's the story about the u.s.-india-pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point. spent 34 years in the u.s. army. retiring as a four-star general in the summer of 2010. he has been commander in afghanistan. he was the director of the joint staff. but perhaps in military circles, most of all, as i mentioned, this five-year period at joint special operations command makes him memorable and historic. general casey at his retirement ceremony in 2010 said that the reality is that stan has
against terrorism. tens of thousands of people in pakistan are protesting in the streets, furious at corruption in their own government. and just this morning, pakistan's highest court ordered the prime minister to be placed under arrest. this is a move critics claim is unconstitutional. security forces, meanwhile, are standing on shipping containers to block access to parliament. they're firing guns and tear gas to hold back the crowds. we'll have updates as news warrants. >>> and now, to your money and a price spike at the supermarket. the cold snap bringing record low temps to the southwest is starting to drive up prices in the produce aisle. people across the country are already paying more for lettuce. prices, meanwhile, for broccoli and cauliflower are likely to rise, as well. farmers from california to arizona say the unusually frigid weather has damaged their crops. and it could take ten days to determine the full impact. >>> and a troubling sign for the economy and the financial security for millions of americans. a new report showing that more than one-quarter of america
. there was a suggestion that he might be held in pakistan, held by terrorists. do you know why she thought that? >> the email came from pakistan. that's why i believe we started looking at the possibility. but i don't believe that he is there. i believe he is still in iran. >> when you say email, you mean the email with those photos, is that right? >> correct. >> i know that an effort was made to try to find the source of the email. did you get any information at all as to who might have sent them to you? >> no. the email address was used one time and one time only. >> was it an email to you directly or to member else? >> it was directly to me. >> so, i mean, i guess that either -- i assume that the email was obtained from your husband, your email address. i assume that's how they got it. was that your assumption? >> i assumed so because he had that on his person when he disappeared -- or was taken. >> all right. so now there has been a shift. now the united states -- the state department believes -- and i don't know if you believe this as well -- that he is not being held by terrorists, but th
' education in her native pakistan. it is remarkable, though, and very heartwarming, isn't it, to see these images of malala, the 15-year-old girl, walking away almost unaided, holding the hand of a nurse, in the hospital. she even had the strength to wave to the staff that has been looking after her over the course of the past three months or so since she was evacuated from pakistan with the terrible head injuries. she's going to be located at her temporary home. her family have moved over from pakistan to birmingham in central england near to the hospital. she's going to be going back with her father and mother and two younger brothers. the doctors at the hospital say that will be best for her, but she'll still come back and forth from the hospital to get clinical treatment and she'll also have to be re-admitted according to the hospital as well for cranial reconstruction surgery. her skull was obviously smashed by the bullet that was fired into her head by the taliban gunmen back in october and she still has to undergo a lot of surgery to, you know, kind of make that damage good, s
rather have part-time work. >> i want to -- you are new to the panel, welcome. you were born in pakistan, you lived all over the world, do you see america, the u.s. as falling behind i terms of a leadership position it may have had in the world in terms of the most advanced country for women say 20 years ago? >> i think as pakistani-american this country has opportunities for everybody. but -- and i also see women here are getting education much more than -- sometimes more than boys. the fact that women are falling behind in the workplace that has to mean that their life circumstances are such that they cannot do -- go beyo part-time work so i totall agree with the congresswoman, i think that you have to -- the government, the state has to prepare the ground for these women to achieve the maximum that they can. >> but i think another take on that is that the woman that worked in corporate america for very long time i found women in managerial positions won't hire other women. i find sometimes we're biased on each other in hiring qualified women. >> i don't agree with that. i am running a
the nomination was announced, a u.s. drone reportedly killed eight more militants in pakistan. yesterday in the announcement at the white house, president obama praised brennan's high standards as an intelligence leader. >> he has worked to imbed our efforts in a strong legal framework. he understands we're a nation of laws. and in moments of debate and decision, he asks the tough questions and he insisted on high and rigorous standards. time and again he has spoken to the american people about our counter-terrorism policies because he recognizes we have a responsibility to be open and transparent as possible. >>> all right. so in the midst of that white house ceremony that was solid and tough stuff about national security, there was one moment of comedy styling, the line of the day goes to leon panetta who is leaving as defense secretary after a long career in washington. he spoke about his retirement plans. >> the time has come for me to return to my wife sylvia, our three sons, their families, our six grandchildren and my walnut farm. dealing with a different set of nuts. >> all right
down drone attacks on al qaeda affiliates in pakistan, yemen, will not use other counterterrorism resources to identify, locate and detain the terrorists involved in the death of our ambassador and others in libya. this inconsistent policy may stem from the president's hasty campaign promise to shut down guantanamo bay, gitmo, prematurely transfer detention facilities in iraq and afghanistan. in doing so the president effectively ended america's ability to detain and interrogate terrorists, depriving the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and other agencies of critical opportunities to obtain information on al qaeda networks. today, as the case of benghazi suspect harzi, has demonstrated, the united states is completely reliant on the cooperation of host countries to detain on our behalf and selectively allow access to suspects. as in the case of harzi, as demonstrated, this approach is fraught with diplomatic roadblocks, costing critical time and getting information from suspects to track terrorist networks. perhaps that is why president obama so often opts to use lethal drone strikes to kill te
. >> "the washington post" reports an american drone strike killed a top taliban leader in pakistan. that taliban leader led attacks against u.s. forces in afghanistan but he had agreed to a truce with pakistan's military. >>> "the new york times" says a highway patrol officer is being sued for allegedly falsifying dozns of dui cases. she pulled over people who she claimed were driving drunk in order to boost her career. she was fired after being named trooper of the year. >>> "usa today" says al jassirzeerassirzeera is buying current tc. current tv was co-founded by former vice president al gore. >>> every time there's a mass shooting in america the demand for guns skyrockets. new figures show after the newtown massacre in december the fbi performed a record number of background checks for people wanting to buy firearms. former cia director john miller is with us this morning. good morning. >> good morning. >> we're seeing sales shoot up. december was a record right? >> that's right. december is always a record. what you have here is three elements that come t
and japan? i'm not sure about the muslim brotherhood aid but on pakistan that's been a big issue, both republicans and depps have said, we need to pare back that aid to pakistan. senator rand paul has been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say, we can't just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if we want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. host: before we let you go here, we're going to take another phone cull, but tell us the fresh minnesota class, some names and faces people should be looking out for, people who might make a name for themselves in the 113th? guest: one is senator tim kaine, he beat george allen in the election, a former governor, he's close to president obama. he was almost picked as vice president. obama and kain talked about him running in the senate, then he ended up winning. that's a democrat to watch. you have to watch the democrats in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott broun. -- scott brown. how is she going to operate? the financial industry is a little nervous about elizabeth warre
possible. >> welcome back the pakistan and teenager who was shot by the caliban, has been released from the hospital in the uk. 15 year- old malala yousafzai was shot while she campaigned for girls' education in her home. she was taken to the university hospital in birmingham for emergency treatment. malala's case one ride recognition for the struggle for women's rights in pakistan. the 15 year-old made the short list for time magazine's " person of the your " and sh now th the girl's father has been given a diplomatic post in the uk. the position has a three-year commitment and virtually guarantees that she will remain in the uk. >> former arizona congressman gabrielle giffords is expected to visit newtown, connecticut today. there are reports that giffords will be at the scene of last month the daily school shooting at sandy the elementary school. all resumes class is just a day in a new building in the nearby town of monroe. guilford is still recovering after being shot in the head at a campaign event in her after being shot in the head at a campaign event in her home state of[ mom
. in a three day rampage, 10 gunman from a pakistan debased militant group that out groupmumbai , attacking a crowded train station, a jewish center and the landmark yaj mahal hotel. headley helped plan the attack and videotape target for the gunman. he faced a maximum of life in prison. he agreed to cooperate and pleaded guilty to avoid a ♪♪ ♪ this is iamazinaz how did diyou fiu us? u i thoughout we mig mht be blatela so i h iad a fibefir analanysis dise and ansure ereugh,ugwe 're fae ly.ly but buyou'reu'ot eotn shn dded you're..re.cruncru?! that hap hpens snsetimet. and you yohelp klpp pep le flel lwithwiholehorainraiberb justju like iku guu . [ femalema announner ]erhey'e differenert, but bhe shee. new frw osted temini-wniats atn [ cr[ unch! ch ...o..f wholwhgraigrfibefi thatth helpseleep eeu fuu . it's a b aig bre bfastfa. [ cr[ unch! ch ...i..n new nelittli bis t smilsm! ohhh bhhring ingin!in ooohhhohooh! h! new nehoney nenchencof oofssm! sgreegrk gherehe we goe orainra honehoy corncoflakesaknd ndunksunf grf k yok rt.rt i'i'm tasttag bog the togurog d thd honehoat tat sam st
we see in pakistan and other places. also in north africa and yemen sometimes when they fire the missiles and take out targets from the air. these are going to be just for surveillance, out there gathering intelligence. the thing you are talking about in this neighborhood is it is hard to have human intelligence. the cia has a network of people that give them information. in this part of the world, in this neighborhood, they don't. they have little intel. the drones will be up there looking for movements of groups they are worried about. >> do we think there is significant numbers of al qaeda in niger? >> in the neighborhood. this is the concern in mali. what happened in the north when the al qaeda linked groups, the islamists came over to take over what was a separatist regime at the time and hijacked it, you have groups spread across this area that encompasses many countries. you can see they are starting to work together. that worries a lot of people. >> i don't know if you can answer this question. how much does this pose a direct threat to us here in the united states wh
with extraordinary care because some of the opposition that we get in parts of pakistan and other parts of the world come from a perception of american arrogance in the use of things like drones. so it's got to be a very mature balanced approach. stuart: would it be true to say that we're withdrawing boots on the ground to fight al qaeda and using high in the sky look down shoot em stuff? >> well, you won't win a war that way because it can only be part of a strategy, and president obama has made that clear. but in a place like afghanistan or even pakistan, what you are really counting on is the host nation forces standing up and doing their part to control areas of the ground on the population. and then in combination, they can be very effective. stuart: general, i want to talk about your book because i have actually read much of it. my share of the task. it is a good book. very easy read. to me it was almost like a thriller. it was great stuff. i have a question for you, you are obviously a very talented man, in the military, brilliant organizer, how are you going to put those talents to work in t
now over there. particularly with the tensions going on in pakistan and egypt and between muslims themselves. i just don't see the need for it. you know -- >> kimberly: don't want to put troops in harm's way for sure. >> dana: one reason you want photographic evidence on certain things to put to rest any conspiracy theories. but that hasn't happened when it came to bin laden. military said and president obama made the announcement. most of the world rejoiced that had finally come to pass. felt more at peace because of it. not that many conspiracy theories of things that the military didn't carry through. >> andrea: there were a couple on random blogs after it happened. i don't want to make a perverse spectacle out of his death. but i was thinking about it today. i remember pictures of the ambassador stevens and how beat up he was. and i thought you know what? i do want to see the photos. i want to see the knowcos. they're terrible. i understand there is a fear about them inciting violence. i have news for you. i won't tiptoe around and i don't think the country should tiptoe aroun
seven in two weeks. the most recent, 11 in pakistan. when we accidently kill the wrong people, aren't their whole families and neighborhoods and communities much more likely to sign up to fight us? doesn't that incite terrorism to fight against us a lot more than a picture would? >> certainly. i'm actually in favor of targeted drone strikes when they're done right because the bottom line we're fighting the bad guys. you can't be a human rights purist when you're in the business of intelligence or trying to take out terrorists. but there are definitely problems with the drone strikes and certainly this collateral damage with what we call collateral damage is to other people the loss of their families and their children, and that is going to create a lot more animosity toward the united states than the release of photos of either bin laden or his funeral you know, and ostensibly somber occasion and feel as the american public we should see--if all that information was already released to two hollywood filmmakers you can't make the argument that we the american people cannot see that.
-qaida wherever they are and wherever they try to hide . we have done that. obviously in afghanistan, in pakistan, we have done in somalia and yemen and we will do it in north africa as well >> also tonight some of the rescued hostages are starting to talk publicly about it. one man from romania said he heard gunshots outside of his office on wednesday. >> they started to shoot guys in the gate. they came inside of the hostage buildings and start to take hostages and i barricaded myself with another colleague of mine. >> so many questions of how they gained access so quickly. the oil company said it spans 7 acres and mined with explosives with the militants planing to blow it up. greg, what do we know about the people who survived and the people who died now that the operation is over. >> it was apparently a nasty end. algeria security forces moved in today when it looked like the hostages were going to be executed by the mill tans. still a lot of people died on all sides . over all in the four-day siege all 32 militants invold were killed. but they also admit 23 hostages and including many forei
in pakistan. >> and it's happened in pakistan. and the long-term impact -- i've said here -- the long-term impact of indiscriminately dropping, you know, bombs on civilians to kill terrorists. >> right. >> has long-term implications for us. we're going to be paying for as a country for decades to come. >> there's a short-term benefit, but the long-term consequences that people not liking americans are feeling that america isn't back to predator nation. >> it's beyond that. you kill my 4-year-old daughter, i don't just not like you. >> yeah. >> i spend the rest of my life trying to destroy you. and that's happening. again, it's not just happening in countries where we have declared war. we're now going into country after country after country. and i guess, rick, what i don't understand is where are the civil liberties lawyers, the constitutional lawyers that were so concerned during the bush administration, for good reason, about how far we push the boundaries in the war on terror? where are those people now that we are killing innocent civilians across the world? >> well, we're still
in afghanistan and pakistan and in that region share about the u.s. footprint in that part of the world. >> but if the reason we are there in addition to helping stabilize that country is to secure our own security here, what happens if when we pull out afghanistan devolves into civil war? does that pose threats for us and our security? >> well, absolutely. what we've seen in the past is that when there's a country like afghanistan that is unstable, without a central government, where people can operate in the shadows and plan attacks, the united states is susceptible to that environment. it's not only here in the united states but u.s. interests around the world. and that's why the u.s. has to maintain or believes it has to maintain that presence there. there's no doubt that going forward many of these issues are going to come to the surface. afghanistan could find itself in a very bloody civil war. iraq after the u.s. withdrawal has not gotten necessarily better. there's still violence. there are still attacks. but to some extent u.s. interests are a little more secured as a result of
afghanistan, pakistan? guest: the group in northern mali, it is making the news these days, is very closely tied. al qaeda and islamic maghrib were the first real franchise of al qaeda outside the middle east and south asia. this group had been formed in the 1990's to fight to overthrow the government of algeria. it metastasized over time. of syrians in north africa were the largest group present foreign fighters into iraq during the first stage of the u.s. presence over there. that led to five years ago when it formally allied itself with al qaeda, the first franchise. there's no direct command and control from al qaeda central, but they draw from the same equality and inspiration and one could argue and that they have been the most effective in recent days. host: here's a headline from the wall street journal -- why should americans care what is happening in mali? guest: this has become the most attractive place for jihadist around the world to gather especially since the french intervention occurred three weeks ago. foreign fighters coming into the region not only from across africa, but
looks like it's dividing itself, it seems reminiscent of pakistan and how its fledgling democracy works between the civilian and the military relationship. >> well, there are a lot of the chronic problems in egypt. no doubt for six years, egypt's major institution was the military. they were the major power brokers, in fact, all of the previous leaders of this country came from the military. mohamed morsi is the first civilian leader to be elected. a lot of people feel that the military and the muslim brotherhood have cut a deal. a lot of people feel the military still pulse a lot of strings behind the scenes of what is happening here. you have a lot of institutional problems in the state as the country tries to grapple with new realities of trying to build democratic institutions that for so many years have been anything but c democratic. >> how can morsi end this crisis? >>. >> well, right now, he feels he has a democratic mandate. he has a large popular base of support. he won the elections. his constitution was passed in a nationwide referendum. his party won a majority in the parli
amount of information about al qaeda in pakistan. the administration continues to use the intelligence every day in drone strikes. it is not just actable intelligence but how they operate. since the program was shut down we have seen the emergence of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. we have had the emergence of al-shabab merging with al qaeda central. and al qaeda in africa. are we struggling in a way? the information we have on pakistan and the lack of information, is it harder to get the intelligence we need because we do not have this tool? >> one of the most important threads of information that i saw when i got there and still in 2006, late in the game, was detainee information. i already suggested to you that i am willing to adjust the detainee program. we have other penetrations and sources and knowledge. we have a better sense of the imminence of attack, what state of danger we are in as a nation. i told you we entered the black side in 2006. lazy journalists sometimes they we closed them. we did not. we kept the option open for the president. between that date and the time i
, the footprint or the cape bill peas we have in other theaters. after years of focusing on pakistan and afghanistan, the map has changed. from mali to algeria, niger, libya, and egypt, the obama administration is struggling to catch up. u.s. intelligence is now working with france whose own spy networks are more established in the former french colonies in africa. and the u.s. will set up a base in niger to fly over safe havens, hoping to catch terrorists before there is a direct threat to the u.s.'s homeland. >> i'm not ruling it out. we take al qaeda wherever they are very seriously and we are not going to rest on our laurels until we find that kind of specific and credible information. >> one thing that has officials very concerned, terrorists operating in africa have u.s., western, european, canadian pass sports that can travel readily and come back to their home countries and it may be very difficult to catch their movements, especially if they are plotting more attacks. wolf? >> very difficult indeed. barbara, thanks very much. let's take a closer look right now at these lates
discusses bill and her commitment to pakistan, senator feinstein described herself as a mayor on a mission. senator feinstein, you had an array of current mayors on a mission spinning with you, ready to do whatever is necessary to make sure this bill becomes a law. let's move forward. thank you. [applause] good afternoon, everyone. thank you very much, senator feinstein. thank you to the colleagues in the senate and the members that are here today in support of this legislation. i'm speaking today on behalf of the major city chiefs cities chiefs association. we are an organization made up of the 63 largest cities in the united states and i have the honor of serving as president of the organization on my way down here, i was on the train i received a call from the executive director of the international association of chiefs of police, which is the largest of all the police organization. unfortunately they could not be here today, but they wanted me to pass on to you their support in this legislation. members and executives, my good friends and chair of the national prevention for gun viole
an enormous amount of information about al qaeda in pakistan. the administration continues to use the intelligence every day in drone stripes. it is not just actable intelligence but how they operate. since the program was shut down we have seen the emergence of all paid in the arabian peninsula. -- of al qaeda in iridium pinto. we have had the emergence of al- shabab merging with out a this central. -- with al qaeda central. and al qaeda in africa. are we struggling in a way? the information we have on pakistan and the lack of information, is it harder to get the intelligence we need because we do not have this tool? >> one of the most important threads of information that i saw when i got there and still mom could 2006, late in the game, was detainee information. at are the suggested to you that i'm willing to adjust the detail program -- i already suggested to you that i am willing to adjust the detainee program. we have other petitions and sources and knowledge. we have a better sense of the imminence of attack, what state of danger we are in as a nation. i told you we entered
. the argument in somalia and yemen and pakistan has been that the consent of the government to hunt down reggae in them as well. homolog foyer is the legal rationale for those strikes. >> i think the government can make a strong argument based on the commander-in-chief power into the constitution that he is right to take action to protect the united states. it's a slippery slope in the co how far it goes. that is independent of the authorization for the use of military force. the passage by congress makes his powers stronger. as justice jackson says the new congress and the president together is hard to do it. one of the differences is the right to detain people is always some thing that has been covered. the right to detain people is always been something when the judicial branch in covered by judicial review and the law. so you may have more right to use force than you do to detain people, the government. >> with the au at math for the constitutional authority, the constitution nor the transfix, the constitution aminorex of congress have been passed or irrelevant. >> i just say if i could get
about the a rather good aid, but on pakistan, republicans and democrats a we need to payback that aid. rand paul has really been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say we cannot just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if you want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. guest: before we let you go, bob cusack, we'll take another phone call. tell us about the freshman class and who are some names, faces people should be looking out for, people might make a name for themselves. guest: senator tim kaine is a democrat from virginia. he defeated george allen in the election. he is a former governor. this is very close to president obama. he was almost vice-president. talk about your money in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott brown. how will she going to operate? the financial industry is a little bit nervous about her. she had the idea to come up with the consumer bureau that was so controversial, the agency that is now up and running as far as wall street reform. those two have strong personalities. they could also
: your parents immigrated to the u.s.? where are they from? guest: there from pakistan. at the end of the day, defining "american" is defining who we are as a society. it is up to congress to get together and fix the problem. host: "the immigration system is not working. it is broke into the corps, and there is a massive problem for the government." and other tweet says, "what about the rule that would have a -- it would have required employers to act when they got a no match letter from social security?" guest: the bush administration issued a rule that when employers got a letter from social security saying that the name and the number do not match or the number is fake or something, look into it, and here you are we are letting you know, the rule said they had to pursue a certain number of steps. if those various things do not resolve it, they had to let the guy go. what happened was that the unholy alliance of the aclu, the u.s. chamber of commerce, and the afl-cio sued that rule because they knew it when identify illegal immigrants in the work force. they succeeded in stopping
family from? guest: >> pakistan. host: you're born in the u.s.? guest: >> yes. at the end of the day, being american is defining who we are as a people and as a society. it's up to congress to get its act together. host: a tweet -- guest: that was a requirement that the bush administration had issued. when employers got a letter from social security saying you given us disinformation about somebody on your payroll and the name and number don't match or the numbers phone or something, so look into export. and we are letting you know. the rule would have said they had to pursue a certain number of steps, a person's a withdrawn, maybe your paperwork is wrong, if those various things don't resolve it, they have to let the guy go. what happened was that the unholy alliance of the aclu, the u.s. chamber of commerce, and afl-cio sued to stop that will because they knew that it would identify illegal immigrants in the workforce and they succeeded in stopping it. this administration pulled the rule out altogether. guest: what mark is asking for is for small business owners to act as immigrati
. the clerk: s. 164, a bill to prohibit the united states from providing financial assistance to pakistan until dr. shakil alfridi is freed. mrs. shaheen: ski for a second reading and in order to place the bill on the calendar under the provisions of rule 14, i object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, it will receive its second reading on the next legislative day. mrs. shaheen: i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 10:00 a.m. on tuesday, january 29, 2013, that following the prayer and pledge, the morning business be deemed expired, the journal of proceedings be approved to date and the time for their two leaders be reserved for their use later in the day, and the senate proceed to a period of morning business until 12:30 p.m., with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each, with the majority controlling the first 30 minutes and the republicans controlling the second 30 minutes. finally, that the senate recess from 12:30 p.m. until 2:15 p.m. to allow for the weekly caucus meeting
outhospital rehabilitation in central england. she was shot in the head in pakistan by the taliban for her campaigning for girls' education. >>> after enduring a month of health problems, secretary of state hillary clinton is planning her return next week to business as usual. the state department says clinton is upbeat and recovering well after being hospitalized for a blood clot in her head. she is at home, resting, but already calling her advisers and working with her staff. we'll have much more with clinton and her special relationship with her daughter, chelsea, coming up. >>> former arizona congresswoman gabrielle giffords heads to newton, connecticut, today, to meet with the families of the vingtss of the deadly school shooting there. giffords was wounded in a mass shooting in tucson, arizona, in 2011. her husband, astronaut mark kelly, will also attend the private meeting today. >>> meantime the survivors of the connecticut shooting headed back to school thursday and one image getting a lot of attention, showing one young student flashing a hopeful message much peace. now cnbc's co
say about the drug is being dropped on the brothers and sisters in pakistan and somalia and yemen -- the drones being dropped? my voice hollers out, and do not take it with your hand on his bible. what would you say about the poverty in america now beginning with the children and the elderly and our working folks in all colors? not just here, around the world. do not hide and conceal his challenge. as much as i'm glad that barack obama won -- i think that brother mitt romney would have been a catastrophe -- brother newt told the truth about vampire capitalism, but that is the system as a whole. but when barack obama attempts to use that rich tradition of so many struggling to produce that voice that pushed martin in the direction that it did, i get upset. people say we are hating obama. no, we are living the tradition that produced martin luther king jr., and we will not allow it to be sanitized, deodorize, sterilized. we want the subversive power to be heard. that is what we think when he said he is going to put his hand on that bible. [applause] and i'm praying for him. i'm pray
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